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Seneca Falls Convention 20 July | First Women's Rights Convention | Summary | Significance | Declarations

Seneca Falls Convention 20 July | First Women's Rights Convention | Summary | Significance | Declarations


The Seneca Falls Convention was the first women's rights conventionIt promoted itself as "a tradition to talk about the social, common, and religious condition and privileges of a woman".Held in Seneca Falls, New York, it crossed two days over July 19– 20, 1848. 


Seneca Falls Convention 20 July | First Women's Rights Convention | Summary | Significance | Declarations
Seneca Falls Convention 20 July | First Women's Rights Convention | Summary | Significance | Declarations

Drawing in far-reaching consideration, it was before long taken after by other women's rights conventions, including the including the Rochester Women's Rights Convention in Rochester, New York, after two weeks. In 1850 the first in a progression of yearly National Women's Rights Conventions met in Worcester, Massachusetts

Female Quakers nearby to the zone sorted out the gathering alongside Elizabeth Cady Stanton, who was not a Quaker. They arranged the occasion amid a visit to the territory by Philadelphia-based Lucretia Mott. Mott, a Quaker, was celebrated for her rhetorical capacity, which was uncommon for non-Quaker ladies amid a period in which ladies were regularly not permitted to talk openly. 

The gathering involved six sessions including an address on law, a silly introduction, and different talks about the part of ladies in the public arena. Stanton and the Quaker ladies exhibited two arranged records, the Declaration of Sentiments and a going with the rundown of resolutions, to be faced off regarding and altered before being advanced for marks. Precisely 100 of around 300 participants marked the record, generally ladies.

It was seen by others as a progressive start to the battle by ladies for finish equity with men. Stanton considered the Seneca Falls Convention to be the start of the ladies' rights development, a conclusion that was resounded in the History of Woman Suffrage.

The tradition's Declaration of Sentiments turned into "the absolute most critical factor in spreading news of the ladies' rights development around the nation in 1848 and into what's to come" 


Declaration of Sentiments


The Declaration of Sentiments, otherwise called the Declaration of Rights and Sentiments, is a a report marked by 68 women in 1848 and a report out of nowhere in the 32 male-100 range out of somewhere in the range of 300 participants at the first main women's rights convention to be sorted out by ladies.

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